Zygmunt Krauze: Portrait of a Lover
Witold Lutosławski: Bucolics (op. M. Frąckiewicz)
Tadeusz Wielecki: Further Continuations
Mieczysław Weinberg: Aria Op. 9 (S. Shmelkov)
Edward Sielicki: Sonata "El libro olvidado"
Mikołaj Majkusiak: Dyad
Andrzej Krzanowski: Relief VIII for accordion and tape

Maciej Frąckiewicz, accordion

Teatr Stu, 7:00 p.m.
 
Tickets prices: N 50 zł/ U 30 zł
***

"The accordion is the instrument of the future, because although it has a turbulent past, it has a future in new literature written for the instrument," said Krzysztof Olczak, a Gdansk-based accordionist and composer. This turbulent past, marked by early jazz, blues and Argentine tango - resounding in smoky pubs and on street corners - is no longer relevant today. Contemporary composers reach for it for at least three reasons. The first is that the accordion is a chameleon instrument - the great organ forms of Bach and the sonorist experiments of the avant-garde sound equally fascinating on it. The second is that, like the piano, the accordion is both a melodic and a harmonic instrument, which means that it can fill a concert evening with itself. The third is that there is no shortage of outstanding accordionists and many of them reach for new music. Maciej Frąckiewicz, the protagonist of this concert, has to his credit over 90 premieres of works, many of which were written with him in mind. This was the case, for example, with Zygmunt Krauze's Portrait of a Lover (2018), written for and consulted with Frąckiewicz, all on the occasion of the Krakow Accordion Festival, a vibrant agora of contemporary music. For the same instrument, Tadeusz Wielecki wrote his Further Strings. Edward Sielicki also wrote his Sonata 'El libro Olvidado' for Frąckiewicz and Michał Majkusiak his Dyad. Because the accordion can be a chameleon and its virtuoso is not condemned to a repertoire dedicated to himself or the instrument, Frąckiewicz made several arrangements of composers of earlier generations: Wajnberg, Lutosławski or Krzanowski. Although the first 'classical' concerto for accordion was written as early as 1836 (Louise Reisner's Thême varié très brillant pour accordéon methode Reisner), it was not until the 20th century that the time of accordion harvest began, a period that has continued to this day. 

Mateusz Ciupka
     
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